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Guest post by: Egle Marija Ramanauskaite Some of you have been keen to hear more news about the project to fight Alzheimer's – EyesOnALZ (formerly known as WeCureALZ), which we introduced in the earlier posts of this series. And guess what – we have big news to tell! And a brand new citizen science…
http://dlvr.it/MMzVLD

Interested in birding or wildlife photography? Enjoy playing Pokemon Go and catching imaginary creatures? If so, you may simply be expressing your inner hunter. So says a new study from Vladimir Dinets, a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, research assistant professor of psychology.
http://dlvr.it/MMxWZr

CDC today announced updates to its interim guidance for pre-pregnancy counseling and prevention of sexual transmission of Zika based on ongoing assessment of available data, primarily extending the timeframe for men with possible Zika exposure but no Zika symptoms to wait before attempting…
http://dlvr.it/MMxWZn

Formaldehyde, a common toxicant and carcinogen recently subjected to new federal regulations, may be more dangerous than previously thought, a new study suggests.
http://dlvr.it/MMxWZX

The first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S. occurred in June of this year, but even now, months later, two aspects of this case continue to puzzle health experts. First, why did this patient die? It is quite rare for a Zika infection to cause severe illness in adults, much less…
http://dlvr.it/MMxWZD

When exposed to cold, clusters of cells within the body's white fat become beige -- a color change that reflects the creation of more energy-producing mitochondria, cellular components that enable cells to burn calories and give off heat. But since white fat cells have very few nerves, how do beige…
http://dlvr.it/MMxWWp

Scientists say they are one step closer to understanding the genetic mechanism of a rare, complex, multiple-gene disorder called Hirschsprung's disease. Their results suggest that many patients develop the disease when multiple mutations in gene regulatory sequences of a specific gene combine to…
http://dlvr.it/MMxWVZ

The American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry was the source of data for research published throughout 2016, including a study examining if atrial fibrillation patients are being prescribed oral anticoagulants, how appropriate use criteria correlates to angioplasty…
http://dlvr.it/MMxWTT

Eutrophication and brownification change phytoplankton community structure and decrease the production of essential omega-3 fatty acids in lakes. Perch growing in oligotrophic clear-water lakes contain 1.5-1.9 times more essential omega-3 fatty acids than those grown in eutrophic and brown-water…
http://dlvr.it/MMxWSW

An adverse outcome pathway, or AOP, is a highly structured way of describing a toxicological process which can lead to an adverse health effect in humans or wildlife, caused by an unsafe exposure to a chemical substance. The first five adverse outcome pathways have now been published by experts.…
http://dlvr.it/MMxWRF

Genetically engineered crops are no different from conventional crops in terms of their risks to human health and the environment, according to a new report.
http://dlvr.it/MMxWPf

It's spring, and I'm attending a luxurious seafood banquet. Platters of shellfish fill the tables: crab with limbs akimbo; shrimp ready to be peeled; miniature lobster-like langostino peering at my dinner plate as if knowing their fate. Raw oysters sit in the center of the platter, piled absurdly…
http://dlvr.it/MMhX73

(This post originally appeared in the online anthropology magazine SAPIENS. Follow @SAPIENS_org on Twitter to discover more of their work.) There are multiple answers to the question of where we come from: early hominins, monkeys, primordial goo, or the Big Bang, to name a few. Today's answer,…
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New research identifies 17 rare human genetic variations associated with risk factors for diseases. The study shows how large scale genomic datasets can be used to help identify potential novel biological targets for studying cardiovascular and other diseases.
http://dlvr.it/MMgz0V

Key sex-determining genes continue to operate in a mammalian species that lacks the Y chromosome, taking us a step further toward understanding sex differentiation, report researchers.
http://dlvr.it/MMgyyM

When people are deprived of food, a number of biological mechanisms are set in motion to adapt the body's metabolism to the conditions of scarcity. One of these processes has been revealed by a team of researchers that has discovered how three important proteins collaborate on a genetic level to…
http://dlvr.it/MMgypB

From 2002 to 2014, there was an increase in the probability of having a prescription opioid use disorder among young adults using prescription opioids for non medical purposes, new research has found.
http://dlvr.it/MMgycl

From scissors and staplers to car keys and cell phones, we pass objects to other people every day. We often try to pass the objects so that the handle or other useful feature is facing the appropriate direction for the person receiving the item, but new research shows that we are less accommodating…
http://dlvr.it/MMXtTD

Despite the fact that influenza leads to more hospitalizations and deaths among children than any other vaccine-preventable disease, parents frequently decline vaccinating their children against influenza because they don't perceive the need, according to a new case-control study.
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People are naturally predisposed to over-use "common-pool resources" such as transportation systems and fisheries even if it risks failure of the system, to the detriment of society as a whole, new research in game theory shows.
http://dlvr.it/MMXt9T

Researchers report they have identified a protein that enables a toxic natural aggregate to spread from cell to cell in a mammal's brain -- and a way to block that protein's action. Their study in mice and cultured cells suggests that an immunotherapy already in clinical trials as a cancer therapy…
http://dlvr.it/MMXt7Q

Scientists have revealed how a genetic switch involved in the packaging of DNA may be key to a cancer cell's ability to keep growing.
http://dlvr.it/MMXt36

Our brains hold on to memories via physical changes in synapses, the tiny connections between neurons. Unexpected molecular mechanisms by which these changes take place have now been revealed by new research.
http://dlvr.it/MMXswJ

A new type of nanodevice for computer microprocessors is being developed that can mimic the functioning of a biological synapse -- the place where a signal passes from one nerve cell to another in the body, report scientists.
http://dlvr.it/MMXsp8

A new scientific study conducted by a team of geneticists has characterized how cells know when to stop translating DNA into proteins, a critical step in maintaining healthy protein levels and cell function.
http://dlvr.it/MMXsdy

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