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A new study has revealed a relationship between chronic periodontitis and lacunar infarct, two common diseases in the elderly. Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the gums, whereas lacunar infarct is a type of cerebral small vessel disease that can lead to a stroke.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160718133338.htm

People with asthma who live near bigger or larger numbers of active unconventional natural gas wells operated by the fracking industry in Pennsylvania are 1.5 to four times likelier to have asthma attacks than those who live farther away, new research suggests.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160718111933.htm

Researchers have identified -- and shown that it may be possible to control -- the mechanism that leads to the rapid build-up of the disease-causing 'plaques' that are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.
http://dlvr.it/LqZNt0

A new study on infantile memory formation in rats points to the importance of critical periods in early-life learning on functional development of the brain. The research reveals the significance of learning experiences over the first two to four years of human life.
http://dlvr.it/LqYrHw

With a major global issue of obesity, researchers are warning of the harmful legacy that parental obesity can have on future generations. It follows a vital breakthrough in obesity research, which shows a father's metabolic health can be passed from generation to generation, affecting not only his…
http://dlvr.it/LqY61S

A new study indicates that the majority of community-dwelling elderly adults are taking prescription medications inappropriately. The study also found a link between underuse -- not taking essential medications -- and an increased risk of dying or needing to be hospitalized.
http://dlvr.it/LqY5kC

Human intelligence is being defined and measured for the first time ever. It turns out that the more variable a brain is, and the more its different parts frequently connect with each other, the higher a person's IQ and creativity are.
http://dlvr.it/LqXsh8

Cognitive brain training improves executive function whereas aerobic activity improves memory, according to new research.
http://dlvr.it/LqXYZP

Researchers, for the first time, have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads -- ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics -- that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly.
http://dlvr.it/LqWwsz

A study that a new material made of carbon nanotubes supports the growth of nerve fibers, bridging segregated neural explants and providing a functional re-connection. The study also observed biocompatibility in vivo of the material, demonstrating that implanting it into the brain of small rodents…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160715171257.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Working parents and grandparents who FaceTime with their toddlers can take heart from a new study that sheds new light that on young children and how they engage in—and learn from—screen-time interactions.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160715115023.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Would having your exercise performance compared to that of your peers motivate you do more? A new study suggests that it might. And adding a financial incentive would only sweeten the deal even more. Comparing performance to average peers (the 50th percentile), and offering financial incentives was…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160715130155.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Children as young as 9 months-old prefer to play with toys specific to their own gender, according to a new study. The research suggests the possibility that boys and girls follow different developmental trajectories with respect to selection of gender-typed toys and that there is both a biological…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160715114739.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

A recent spate of unexpected mosquito-borne disease outbreaks -- most recently the Zika virus, which has swept through parts of the Americas -- have highlighted the need to better understand the development and spread of little-known diseases and for new strategies to control them, a new review…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714151423.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

A team of researchers has identified novel therapeutic monoclonal antibody candidates isolated from Zika-infected patients and new strategies for Zika virus diagnostics. A new article describes for the first time an in-depth analysis of the human antibody and T cell immune response to the Zika…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714150631.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

The function of sparse population of inhibitory neurons in memory encoding has been explained in a new article. The study focused on identifying the synaptic connections between inhibitory PV-INs, sensory pathways and neighboring principal neurons in the basolateral amygdala, a brain region…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714135257.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Scientists have developed a robust method for characterizing human embryonic stem cells and their potential for medical applications.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714135026.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

A multi-institutional study has identified a promising treatment strategy for Huntington's disease (HD). The novel compound appears to protect against neurodegeneration in cellular and animal models of HD by means of two separate mechanisms -- inhibiting the regulatory enzyme SIRT2 and activating…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714135014.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Biologists are increasingly interested in the behavior of individual cells, rather than the one of an entire cell population. A new method could revolutionize single cell analysis. The technology uses the world's smallest syringe to sample the content of individual cells for molecular analyses.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714135022.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

People with a rare autoimmune disorder produce autoimmune antibodies that appear to be linked to a reduced occurrence of type 1 diabetes, new research has found. The study suggests these antibodies could limit immune-related diseases and may have therapeutic potential.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714135011.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Indiana University researchers have created a virtual tissue model of diabetes in the eye that shows precisely how a small protein that can both damage or grow blood vessels in the eye causes vision loss and blindness in people with diabetes. The study could also lead to better treatment for…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714135116.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

International stem cell scientists have discovered the switch to harness the power of cord blood and potentially increase the supply of stem cells for cancer patients needing transplantation therapy to fight their disease.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714135024.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Researchers have used a recently-developed imaging technique that makes tissue transparent to visualize brain tissue from deceased patients with Alzheimer's disease, exposing nonrandom, higher-order structures of beta amyloid plaques -- sticky clumps of a toxic protein typically found in the brains…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714134750.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

MDMA, more commonly known as ecstasy, promotes strong feelings of empathy in users and is classified as a Schedule 1 drug -- a category reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. But in a new article, two researchers call for a rigorous scientific exploration of…
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160714134748.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

Scientists have captured new images of a calcium-shuttling molecule that has been linked to aggressive cancers. The three-dimensional structure could help researchers develop novel therapies and diagnostic tools for diseases that are caused by a malfunction in calcium adsorption.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160715171308.htm?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

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